• ALLIED HEALTH

    14002 DYNAMICS OF HEALTH IN SOCIETY (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOLOGY/LAB
    Grade 10 (E) Full Year Course

    Dynamics of Health Care in Society course provides an orientation to health care services and their delivery. It presents an interdisciplinary perspective, focusing on process skills such as critical thinking, ethical reasoning, effective communication and ways to continue independent learning throughout life. The course shows how all health care providers acquire professional competence in dealing with the issues and problems they face as well as the role they play as informed consumers.

    Recommendation: 10th graders in the Allied Health Program and had taken Biology in the 9th grade.

    14154 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOLOGY/LAB; DYNAMIC OF HEALTH IN SOCIETY
    Grade 11 (E) Full Year Course

    In Medical Terminology course, students learn how to identify medical terms by analyzing their components. These courses emphasize defining medical prefixes, root words, suffixes, and abbreviations. The primary focus is on developing both oral and written skills in the language used to communicate within health care professions.

    03053 ANATOMY PHYSIOLOGY I (6 Credits)
    Prerequisite: BIOLOGY/LAB; MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
    Grades 12 (E) Full Year Course


    Anatomy and Physiology is the study of the structure and function of the human body. This course follows a sequential development of the major body systems in an organized and structured curriculum. The course is designed to give the students a selective overview of human anatomical structure and an analysis of human physiological principles. Labs will include slide work, dissection of various animals and studies of the human skeleton. The course will also use computer-simulated dissection.

    ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION

    21106 MECHANICAL DRAWING (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite:
    Grade 9 (G) Full Year Course
    This course introduces students to and help them refine the technical craft of drawing illustrations to represent and/or analyze design specifications, using examples drawn from industrial applications. This course is intended to help students develop general drafting skills, but place a particular emphasis on sectioning, auxiliary views, revolutions, and surface development. Students will learn basic machining and fabrication processes as they draw schematic diagrams featuring cams, gear, linkages, levers, and pulleys.

    21107 CAD I (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: N/A
    Grade 10 (G) Full Year Course

    This course is designed to serve as an intermediary step to more advanced drafting course. Students will be introduced to computer-aided drafting systems available in the industry.

    21149 CAD II (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: CAD I
    Grade 11 (G) Full Year Course

    Designed as an independent study course, students will explore drafting-related topics of interest. Students will get the opportunity to expand their expertise in a particular application, to explore a topic in greater detail, or to develop more advanced skills.

    BUSINESS

     


    12051 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: 
    Grade 9 (G) One Semester Course

    Introductory Business courses survey an array of topics and concepts related to the field of business. These courses introduce business concepts such as banking and finance, the role of government in business, consumerism, credit, investment, and management. They usually provide a brief overview of the American economic system and corporate organizations. Introductory Business courses may also expose students to the varied opportunities in secretarial, accounting, management, and related fields. (SCED)

    12059 MANAGEMENT AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
    Grade 10 (G) Full Year Course

    This course is designed to provide a basic overview of current business, finance, and information systems and trends as well as introduce students to the basics and foundations required for financial business environments. Emphasis is placed on developing proficiency with fundamental computer applications, so that they may be used as communication tools for enhancing personal and workplace proficiency in an information-based society. This also includes proficiency with computers using databases, spreadsheets, presentation applications, financial and tax software application and the integration of these programs using software that meets industry standards.

    04164 BUSINESS LAW (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
    Grade 11 (G) Full Year Course

    Business law courses present a history and philosophy of law and the legal system in the United States, with a particular emphasis on those topics affecting students as future business leaders and employees. Such topics may include contracts, commercial paper and debt instruments, property rights, employer/employee relationships, and constitutional rights and responsibilities.

    12053 ENTREPRENEURSHIP (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: MANAGEMENT & INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS     
    Grade 12 (G)  Full Year Course

    Entrepreneurship courses acquaint students with the knowledge and skills necessary to own and operate their own businesses. Topics from several fields typically form the course content: economics, marketing principles, human relations and psychology, business and labor law, legal rights and responsibilities of ownership, business and financial planning, finance and accounting, and communication. Several topics surveyed in Business Management courses may also be included.

    12164 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS   
    Grade 10 (G)  Full Year Course

    Principles of Marketing courses offer students insight into the processes affecting the flow of goods and services from the producer to the consumer. Course content ranges considerably as general marketing principles such as purchasing, distribution, and sales are covered; however, a major emphasis is often placed on kinds of markets, market identification, product planning, packaging, pricing, and business management.

    12160 BRANDING AND MERCHANDISING (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING
    Grade 11 (G)  Full Year Course

    This course is designed to provide students with practical backgrounds in retailing, with emphasis on merchandising, promotion/display, selling, and career planning. The content of this course will also include fundamental principles of human relations.

    12167 MARKET RESEARCH MERCHANDISING (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: BRANDING AND MERCHANDISING
    Grade 10 (G)  Full Year Course

    Market Research covers the principles and functions of marketing from the standpoint of conducting business on the internet. Typically, students develop such skills as using the Internet as a marketing tool, conducting a marketing analysis via the Internet, planning marketing support activities, managing an electronic marketing campaign, managing/owning a business via the Internet, and analyzing the impact of the Internet on global marketing.

    20151 INTRODUCTION TO LOGISTICS (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: 
    Grade 9 (G)  Full Year Course

    This introductory course engages students in contextual problems that introduce students to the concepts of supply chains, warehouse location, warehouse design, inventory management contingency planning, and in- sourcing and out-sourcing decisions. These concepts form the basis of global logistics and supply chain management. Students will explore these concepts to learn how professionals examine options to maximize the use of resources in establishing physical networks.

    20152 FUNCTIONAL AREAS IN LOGISTICS (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: INTRODUCTION TO LOGISTICS
    Grade 10 (G)  Full Year Course

    This basic course forces students to explore deeper understandings of the concepts they discovered in the previous course as they navigate projects on transportation, loading methods, information technology, emergency responsiveness, and the supply chain for manufacturing. Students use their experiences in this course to discover ways in which professionals minimize the outlay of resources while improving efficiency and ability in the global market.

    20197 GLOBAL LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: FUNCTIONAL AREAS IN LOGISTICS
    Grade 11 (G)  Full Year Course

    This advanced course offers challenging projects that require students to look at the global implications of the industry in more earnest as they experiment with decisions over intermodal transportation, route selection, international shipping regulations, emergency preparedness, cultural awareness, business ethics and international trade restrictions related to a distribution strategy. Students develop their understanding of the industry in this course and truly build their awareness of the challenges of doing business in a world with multiple borders that must be traversed. 

    20198 GLOBAL LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: GLOBAL LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT
    Grade 12 (G)  Full Year Course

    This advanced course allows students to see the implications of all the concepts they learned in the previous three courses as they consider environmental impact, selecting business partners in a global and domestic chain, information technology and decisions regarding e-commerce. Students explore the ongoing need to balance dependability and resource outlay in meeting customer demands around the world. Projects will expand students’ decision-making skills as they tackle issues related to transportation, distribution networks and manufacturing.

    12104 ACCOUNTING I (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
    Grade 10 (G)  Full Year Course

    The Business students will be exposed to a general knowledge of accounting principles and the accounting cycle. Accounting is an essential aspect of every business  institution and organization. As future  workers,  small  business owners, and entrepreneurs, students who understand basic accounting principles will be more knowledgeably to manager their companies’ financial resources. As citizens, future  parents,  and  investors,  these  students will be better prepared to make the economic decisions that will affect their communities  and  their  personal economics futures. This course provides an advanced in-depth study of selected topics in accounting, using case studies, individual and group problem solving, practical approaches to dealing with clients, ethics, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able  to demonstrate competent analytical skills and effective communication of their analysis in written and/or oral presentations. As part of this course, students may be required to prepare a sample joint income tax return for a married couple, establish and use an accounting system, as well as use a microcomputer to record accounting information.

    12103 ACCOUNTING II (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: ACCOUNTING I
    Grade 11 (G)  Full Year Course

    Students will reinforce their knowledge of accounting principles and learn the principles of corporate, cost, and manufacturing accounting principles while preparing for bookkeeping and accounting employment, and/or preparing for further study in accounting and/or business. This course is designed to analyze special accounting issues, which may include business combinations, partnerships, international accounting,  estates,  and  trusts. Emphasis  is  on analyzing transactions and preparing working papers and financial students. Upon completion, students should be able to solve a wide variety of problems by advanced application of accounting principles and procedures.

    12149 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: ACCOUNTING I & II
    Grade 12 (G)  Full Year Course

    Emphasis is on special problems, which may include leases, bonds, investments, ratio analyses, present value applications, accounting changes, and corrections. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display an analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. Accounting computer problems involving preparation and completion of spreadsheets are integrated throughout the course.

    COMPUTER AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    10003 COMPUTER & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: 
    Grade 9 (G) Full Year Course

    The purpose of Computer and Information Technology I (CIT I) is to produce and promote Information Literacy, the basis for lifelong learning.  This course is designed for students to learn about technology using technology.  Project Based Learning, Inquiry, and Problem Based Learning will be emphasized to create a student centered learning environment that enables learners to master content, extend their investigations, become more selfdirected, and assume greater control over their own learning.  CIT I will focus on Digital Citizenship, Information and Communication Literacy, Tech Competency, Information Literacy Process, Effects of Technology on Society, and Introduction to Computer Programming.

    10049 COMPUTER & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY II (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: COMPUTER & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
    Grade 10 (G) Full Year Course

    Computer and Information Technology II (CIT II) introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world.  Project Based Learning, Inquiry, and Problem Based Learning will be emphasized to create a student centered learning environment that enables learners to master content, extend their investigations, become more self-directed, and assume greater control over their own learning. CIT II will expand on Digital Citizenship, Information and Communication Literacy, Tech Competency, Information Literacy Process, Effects of Technology on Society, and Introduction to Computer Science. 

    10008 COMPUTER & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY III (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: COMPUTER & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I & II
    Grade 11 (G) Full Year Course

    Computer and Information Technology III (CIT III) will focus on web development. Students will learn HTML, CSS and other languages to develop web pages and web sites. CIT III will involve both the aesthetics and the mechanics of a web site. Students will learn how to use web building tools, languages and requirements of designing.  They will create, use and maintain a blog as a digital portfolio.  Students will create, develop and share web pages and websites. CIT III will expand on Digital Citizenship, Information Literacy, and Computer Science Principles.

    INTERNSHIPS

    22998 STRUCTURED LEARNING EXPERIENCE (5 Credits)
    Prerequisite: APPROVAL BY THE SLE COORDINATOR
    Grade 12 (G) Full Year Course

    The Structured Learning Experience (SLE) (N.J.A.C. 6A: 19-1.2, NJDOE) is characterized by experiential, supervised educational activities designed to provide students with the exposure to the requirements and responsibilities of specific job titles or job groups, and to assist them in gaining employment skills and making career and educational decisions. A structured learning experience may be either paid or unpaid, depending on the type of activities in which the student is involved. All structured learning experiences must adhere to applicable State and federal child labor laws and other rules of the State Departments of Education and Labor. Structures learning experiences may include, but are not limited to:

    • Apprenticeships         
    • School-Based Enterprises
    • Community Service         
    • Volunteer Activities
    • Cooperative Education         
    • Vocational Student Organizations
    • Internships         
    • Work Experience Career 
    • Job Shadowing Exploration (WECEP)

    Structured Learning Experiences/career orientation coordination includes experiences designed for career awareness, career exploration, and/or career orientation. These experiences must be in non-hazardous occupations in any career cluster.

    Students enrolled in the SLE program would receive a total of 15 credits for successful completion of both the classroom and workplace portions of the program. The classroom portion of the program would be assigned five credits, and the workplace portion ten credits. However, both portions of the program must be successfully completed according to program criteria in order for the student to receive the 15 credits.

    Students will receive non-hazardous, on-site work experience at an agreed upon location that offers experience in the students’ Academy area of interest. The Structured Learning Experience (SLE) Coordinator, the employer and the student will complete a contract once the job location is decided. Upon completion of related paperwork, the student will begin employment and is to be employed at this location at least until the end of the class. In addition, the SLE Coordinator will visit the worksite of each student enrolled in the program at least once every 10 working days to monitor compliance on behalf of both the student and the employer.

    Students would be responsible for their own travel to and from their respective job site.