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    PRINCIPAL’S BOOK OF THE MONTH – January 2017
    Ruby’s Wish written by Shirin Yim Bridges and Sophie Blackall
     
    Summary: Ruby is unlike most little girls in old China. Instead of aspiring to get married, Ruby is determined to attend university when she grows up, just like the boys in her family. Based upon the inspirational story of the author's grandmother and accompanied by richly detailed illustrations, Ruby's Wish is an engaging portrait of a young girl who strives for more and a family who rewards her hard work and courage.
     
    Lesson Objectives: This lesson plan will assist students with understanding fictionalized fact-based stories as well as analyzing text for details related to time frame and cultural details.
    *To be able to understand human interactions from fictionalized non-fiction text; why characters act and feel the way they do; using evidence gleaned from text
    *To be able to use expression and intonation to make oral reading more engaging
    *To be able to make cultural connections with text (text -to-world connections)
     
    Strategies:
    Students will be able to pull implicit meaning from text as they look for the evidence behind particular actions, feelings and conversation
    Students will be able to expand awareness of cultural differences based on evidence provided by the text, and analyze the text for evidence of time frame
     
    Strategic Lesson Plan:
    1. Show the cover of the story on the SMARTboard and explain to the students this story is a fictionalized account of the author’s grandmother’s life (can show the last page as evidence of this)
    2. Ask the students what kind of clues they might need to look for in a text to figure out the time frame in which a story takes place and what country/culture a story might be about
    3. Invite the students to share the story together in pairs on Tumblebooks (or independently) and challenge them to find evidence of a different time and place
    4. While students are listening/reading, circulate and provide support as needed
    5. As pairs of readers complete their reading, encourage them to discuss what they noticed about the story and where they found their evidence of time frame and culture
    6. Once students have read through the story together and feel comfortable with expressing their ideas, bring them back together as a large group for discussion
    7. Ask for evidence of their ideas; explain this is a fictionalized account of actual events
    8. Ask students to talk about Ruby and what made her different – how do they know this? (from her words and actions)
    9. In student writing books/ logs, ask them to write a response to Ruby in letter format – they can ask questions, provide encouragement or tell a story about themselves
    10. This can be used as a formative assessment activity to assess comprehension skills and capacity to respond to text.
     
    TEACHERS - ACCESS THE E-BOOK BY FOLLOWING THESE STEPS:
    1. LOG ONTO THE GORDON PARKS ACADEMY HOME PAGE.
    2. SELECT THE MEDIA CENTER LINK ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE OF THE PAGE.
    3. SELECT THE MEDIA CENTER ONLINE RESOURCES LINK.
    4. SELECT TUMBLEBOOKS RESOURCE ŕ USERNAME: PARKS     PASSWORD: BOOKS ŕ SEARCH THE TITLE OF THE BOOK.